Международная Федерация русскоязычных писателей (МФРП)

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International Federation of Russian-speaking Writers (IFRW)

Registration No 6034676. London. Budapest
МФРП / IFRW - Международная Федерация Русскоязычных ПисателейМеждународная Федерация Русскоязычных Писателей


Today: 25 ноября 2017.:

Literature and Culture News

Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera at the Bowes Museum

An odd couple take over the former home of another odd couple. No wonder Frida Kahlo's winking. The Guardian Northerner's arts ace Alan Sykes explainsFrida Kahlo and Diego Rivera made a pretty odd couple – Rivera the much older, much travelled, much married friend of Modigliani and Picasso, Kahlo the Hungarian-Jewish-Spanish-Mexican surrealist painter from the Casa Azul. The Bowes Museum's founders John and Josephine Bowes weren't exactly conventional either – he the race horse-owning illegitimate heir to 43,200 acres and a large chunk of the Durham coalfield, she a grande horizontale actress turned obsessive collector. According to the Bowes' head of exhibitions, Vivien Vallack, the museum's visitors are interested in photography exhibitions as well as the many other two and three dimensional delights of their treasure house in the Dales. So when the Mexican Embassy offered her the chance to be the only place in Britain to host an exhibition of photographs documenting the extraordinary lives of Kahlo and Rivera, she jumped at it. The long and bloody Mexican revolution was fortunate in having Rivera as its unofficial "artist in residence" – with Jacques-Louis David and the French revolution arguably the only other one with a great artist on hand to record it. After Rivera's early cubist period, he tended towards a socialist realist figuration, but his work can also be said to hark back to the fresco painting tradition of renaissance Italy – with workers and their struggles as the subject of his murals, rather than princes and their battles. Although a communist, he got on surprisingly well with American millionaires – he created "Detroit Industry", a huge mural for Henry Ford, another for the New York Stock Exchange Luncheon Club, as well as a commission from the Rockefellers. In an act of astonishing vandalism, the Rockefeller Center in New York, having commissioned him to create "Man at the Crossroads" a giant mural for the ground floor wall of the centre, took exception to the fact that Rivera had inserted a portrait of Lenin, leading the managers to destroy the entire work. Rivera got his revenge, as he used his fee from the Rockefellers to paint another portrait of Lenin (this time with Trotsky) as part of a mural in the Independent Labour Institute in Mexico City. One of the photographs here shows Kahlo typing a letter of protest which Rivera is dictating about the removal of the mural. Frida Kahlo said:I suffered two grave accidents in my life. One involved a bus, the other is Diego. Diego was more than double her age when they met, and the marriage was stormy – or rather marriages, as they divorced and then got together again. It was while Rivera was working for Ford in Detroit that Kahlo painted Miscarriage in Detroit, one of the first of her self-portraits. Rivera said of it:Frida began work on a series of masterpieces which had no precedent in the history of art – paintings which exalted the feminine quality of truth, reality, cruelty and suffering. Never before had a woman put such agonized poetry on canvas as Frida did at this time in Detroit. One of the photographs here shows her working in her studio under her double self-portrait, The Two Fridas, one of which has her heart cut open, while the other, heart intact, holds a miniature of Rivera, which was painted while the couple were divorced. Another of her admirers was the French surrealist Andre Breton, who visited Mexico in 1938, and described it as a "surrealist country par excellence". When Trotsky, chased out of Norway by Stalin's pressure, arrived in Mexico in 1938, he stayed with the couple, and Frida's affair with him was one of the factors that led to her brief divorce. Here is a YouTube clip of the three of them together, with twangy Mexican guitar accompaniment.Whether Rivera was actively complicit in Trotsky's murder does not seem to be proven, but the fact that the assassins used his truck in their attack is suspicious, to say the least. The photographs in this exhibition form a timeline that documents the two artists' lives. Photographs from both weddings are here, and the first known photograph of the couple, at a May Day rally in 1929, while a poignant last picture of them together was taken in 1952, with both clearly unwell. The last picture of Frida shows that she never lost her revolutionary zeal – despite having had her gangrenous leg amputated, she is pictured, only 11 days before her death in 1954, attending a demonstration against the CIA's overthrow of Guatemala's democratically elected president, Jacobo Arbenz. See more on that in this Guardian Northerner post from yesterday. This exhibition has been organised by the Mexican Foreign Office and the National Institute of Fine Art in Mexico City. It is a part of the Vamos festival of Latin and Lusiphone events and exhibitions happening across the North East in June and July. Complicidades: Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera opens at the Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, this Saturday and runs until 24 June., before moving to the Ukraine.ArtPhotographyFrida KahloMexicoMuseumsMuseumsDurham UniversityExhibitionsUkraineAlan Sykesguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. 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A Christmas Carol | Theatre review

Sherman Cymru, CardiffThe Sherman's festive shows are always a treat, but Gary Owen's new version of A Christmas Carol is an impressive adaptation for our times. Best of all, the modern touches – references to MPs' expenses, hedge funds and the war in Afghanistan – are subtly done in a production that streamlines and updates the original for a younger audience while keeping its moral core intact.This is a rousing family show, with belly laughs and cheering songs, yet it also presents the dark side of Dickens's tale with tremendous boldness. The depiction of Christmas Future, in which feral children terrorise a house-bound Scrooge, is bleak enough to make us all want to mend our ways.Owen doesn't linger over evidence of Scrooge's miserly, wicked behaviour, opting instead to focus on what brutalised him. The workhouse, a terrifying black mill in Patrick Burnier's stark design, is always quite literally in the background. Director Amy Hodge has, in Mark Frost, opted for a younger Scrooge and this works: he is portrayed as a single-minded, workaholic entrepreneur, the kind who makes the decisions on Dragons' Den.The ghosts are a mix of spectral forms and beasts, from sci-fi nightmares to Simon Nehan's majestically camp performance as Christmas Present, who was played somewhere between an annoying Big Brother contestant and a drag version of Gavin and Stacey's Nessa. There are lots of contemporary references and echoes – the interval is playfully handled like the dramatic hook at the end of a soap opera – but the production, which is boisterous and thoughtful in equal measure, retains a Victorian sternness. Some adaptations ditch this, and others are hemmed in by it; this hugely likable show is confident enough to work with that, and meld it with our world.Rating: 4/5TheatreCharles DickensChristmasElisabeth Mahoneyguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Win tickets to a Soulmates screening

Win tickets to a Soulmates (500) Days of Summer screening

And that's a wrap...

The Guardian Unlimited Music team is home or on its way home. For a round-up of the weekend, visit our Glastonbury special report. For all the reviews from this weekend - the Who and the Kaiser Chiefs have been added, with more to come - click here. And for all the music blog posts - new ones by Jack Penate and the Rakes have been added - visit the music blog.Oh, and here's editor Alan Rusbridger's Flickr set of the National Youth Orchestra. Everyone pitches in during Glastonbury here.Glastonbury festivalGlastonbury 2007Festivalsguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Mark Ronson: awesome

So saith Betty Clarke in her review.Glastonbury festivalGlastonbury 2007FestivalsMark Ronsonguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Pump up the Bassey

Dame Shirley shows the Arctic Monkeys how it's done. Photograph: Carl de Souza/AFP/GettyAlex Needham gives Shirley Bassey - and her full orchestra - nine out of 10.Meanwhile, on the music blog, Hard-Fi tells us why they're playing Glastonbury even though they're not getting paid, and Alice Fisher gives her latest fashion dispatch.But wait, there's more: Have you seen the Go! Team's photo gallery?Glastonbury festivalGlastonbury 2007Festivalsguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

The Big Questions: Ricky and Simon from the Kaiser Chiefs

Two-fifths of Leeds' biggest pop-rockers plan to trump the Killers' pyrotechnics display with a little help from the Red Arrows. Us: What have you learnt about yourself at Glastonbury? Ricky: Ohh, that's a good question. I guess the whole idea is that- hey, it's Tim Jonze! Tim! (Tim Jonze briefly hijacks the interview. That is so Tim Jonze ). Anyway, the whole idea is that you let go, youknow? 'You don't worry about washing your hands every five minutes.Simon: It teaches you about new things, such as piercing your tongue. Tattoos, all that nonsense.Us: So are you a Glastonbury hippy or a Glastonbury raver?Ricky: Hippy Simon: Yeah, hippy.What time did you start drinking?Ricky: One minute past midnight, so technically this morning.What's your essential but luxury item that everyone should bring to Glastonbury?Simon: Money. Ricky: You'd be surprised how much money you need here, I think there should be more bartering. I think the average person here goes through about about £15k in a weekend. And that's just on noodles. Simon: I only come for the noodles.Us: What's the one word that sums up Glastonbury? You can't say mud. Ricky: Cocktail.Us: Your Glastonbury cliche? Simon: All that rolling around in the mud. Ricky: You must regret that as soon as you finish. 20 seconds later, once the euphoria's over. I'd like to try mud rolling but in my garden, so I can shower straight after.Us: What act are you gutted you missed? Ricky: I'm gutted I missed radiohead in '95! Was it '95 or '97? I would have liked to have seen the competition so I could see what we're up against to beat everyone.Us: 2005 was a big year for you guys here, how you gonna beat it? Ricky: We honestly haven't planned it that way, we have tried not to let it get us too...bogged down!Simon: We picked our slot, sort of, so we wanted to support the Who and we thought Sunday might be sunny and anyone still here won't be bothered by the mud so they'll be up for it and we can give everyone a great time.Any surprises in store? Simon: Jetplanes. Ricky: We've got the Red Arrows going over as we do Take My Breath Away, which we're doing.Glastonbury festivalGlastonbury 2007FestivalsRosie Swashguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

How about them wellies?

Shirley Bassey makes her way to the stage ahead of her performance on the Pyramid Stage... Photograph: Yui Mok/PAThat's Dame Shirley, to you.Glastonbury festivalGlastonbury 2007Festivalsguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Mardy bums: stand up for safe water and sanitation

The 'she pee' female urinals at Glastonbury festival. Photograph: David Levene/GuardianThis curious Glastonbury 2007 shot's been kicking around the photo system for a couple of days, so we thought it was about time we show it to everyone. This is a female urinal. It is called the "she pee". It was erected by charity WaterAid to raise awareness about their mission "to overcome poverty by enabling the world's poorest people to gain access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene education".But how does it work? Click below to read the instructions. Glastonbury festivalGlastonbury 2007FestivalsKelly Nestruckguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Verbal vomit

Betty Clarke really hated the pseudo-goth Horrors.But Paul MacInnes has fonder words for the Cold War Kids.Glastonbury festivalGlastonbury 2007Festivalsguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds


© Interpressfact, МФРП-IFRW 2007. Международная Федерация русскоязычных писателей (МФРП) - International Federation of Russian-speaking Writers (IFRW).